Emily Ratajkowski says she is vulnerable because she is strong – and thin

As part of her stop in Dublin, Emily Ratajkowski visited the house that inspired Taylor Swift’s lyrics in Look What You Made Me Do – and those disturbing apartment titles have her recalling the perils of social media in her latest spread for Nylon magazine

As part of her stop in Dublin on her “Blue Light Tour”, Emily Ratajkowski visited the house that inspired Taylor Swift’s lyrics in Look What You Made Me Do – and those disturbing apartment titles have her recalling the perils of social media in her latest Nylon magazine spread.

Ratajkowski, the 24-year-old model-turned-actress, was named one of the world’s 25 most desirable women for 2018. It’s a timely decision, given that she is also spearheading a campaign against model inequality.

The model’s critics describe her as an image-obsessed fame-chaser, a sensationalist commercial product. “The trick is to be both,” she said in Nylon. “To be that combination of commercially attractive and exuberant, for work, and super self-conscious and self-aware.”

She added: “The novelty of doing this sort of thing goes quickly. There’s a lot of risk involved, because you put yourself out there. That’s not to say I don’t feel bad about it, but I like to think that I put myself out there, and I’m sticking by it.”

She famously became the poster girl for the #effyourbeautystandards movement after posting a picture of herself in a white crochet bikini on Instagram, showing off her flat stomach. Others soon followed suit, showing off their legs and cleavage in more risque Instagram posts.

Emily Ratajkowski: ‘I wanted to create a book that we could all read’ Read more

“I was a little bit at a loss as to how to address this within my career,” Ratajkowski told Nylon. “I didn’t really have a position that said, ‘I’m there to be liked and I need to do X or Y.’ I’m pretty in my head, but I also tend to be a very interesting person. Maybe it’s the French in me. And then it kind of hit me: I really did have no idea that this would be this big.”

By freeing herself from expectations to only talk about “social issues”, Ratajkowski argued that it had allowed her to push boundaries without being pigeonholed.

She added: “I really wish the internet would stop with the post-internet, 21st-century world view of, ‘You can’t do anything in your life without having to have your sexuality and your gender misconstrued and manipulated.’ And then the fuck that’s gonna do to women in general.

“I’m not meant to be the only woman in the room or the only woman in the industry. I wasn’t just famous; I was famously sexy; I could dance well. What that did was open up the medium, even if it was just two people fucking and how that is now worse because of this.”

She added: “I’m not trying to reform or change the internet. I just think it’s the proper use of technology that it can be used well. It needs to be used for the benefit of people instead of the collection of people and their wealth.”

Ratajkowski told the Guardian last month that she struggled to feel comfortable in her own skin after discovering she had curves instead of skinny limbs in 2015. “I felt like my body, like my femininity, had got taken away from me. In a way, I didn’t necessarily agree with the compliments I was getting – I wanted to curl up in a ball and die,” she said.

“It’s important to have good, regular sex with a significant other, but it’s also super important to have a date to the movies, and to let your hair down, and feel like you’re being your authentic self. I had all that, but I had the pressure to look good, and to be that sexy, and then later on I would have pressure to look sexy again. And all of a sudden, I felt naked and ugly, and nobody wanted to fuck with me.”

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